Free Speech Under Threat in Iraq

Since 2019, the Iraq protest movement, dubbed the “Tishreen (October) Revolution,” has revealed the lengths to which both state and non-state actors are willing to silence dissent and free speech. Iraqi activists and protestors have been subjected to vicious and persistent hate speech campaigns, both online and offline, that aim to discredit them and the movement.

Demolishing Human Rights in the Name of Reconstruction: Lessons...

Although the Syrian context is different in that the conflict is still ongoing, drawing comparisons between Beirut’s Solidere and Syria’s Marota City sheds light on the politics of reconstruction and how reconstruction projects can result in further harm to civilians.

Religious Institutions under the Pressure of COVID-19: Traditional Policies...

The coronavirus pandemic has imposed exceptional circumstances and tough challenges on Egyptian religious institutions, which have been tested when it comes to policies of social distancing in an attempt to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Detention During COVID-19: What MENA Governments Are, Aren’t, and...

Across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), countries are taking measures in an attempt to curb the spread of COVID-19. These national responses have included the creation of emergency hotlines, awareness campaigns, stay-at-home orders, and curfews. There is one underemphasized issue that will remain central to a country’s success in “flattening the curve”: detention.

TIMEP and CPJ: Joint UPR Submission on Press Freedom...

TIMEP and the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) have submitted a joint stakeholder report ahead of the third cycle of Lebanon’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR), set to take place in January and February 2021. 

TIMEP Brief: Export of Surveillance to MENA Countries

The export of surveillance technology to MENA governments has led to violations of the rights to life, privacy, and freedom of speech, among others, imperiling journalists, activists, and researchers.

TIMEP Brief: Use of Surveillance Technology in MENA

MENA governments continue to purchase, weaponize, and employ surveillance technology, regardless of the fact that abuses related to use have been credibly documented.

Ten years ago, Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi stood in the middle of traffic, shouted “How do you expect me to make a living?” and set himself on fire, catalyzing popular protests in Tunisia and across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and creating a lens through which advocates, scholars, and policymakers understand the region until today.