Home / Egypt Parliament Watch
02/05/2019 . By TIMEP

TIMEP’s infographic “Amending Egypt’s Constitution” helps users better understand the process for amending the constitution as laid out by Articles 133 to 143 of the House of Representatives’ bylaws and Article 226 of the constitution.

12/12/2018 . By TIMEP

Since Egypt’s House of Representatives first convened in January 2016, it has passed numerous pieces of legislation, with significant implications for the political, economic, and social lives of Egyptians. Yet,

12/12/2018 . By TIMEP

Seven parliamentary entities are defined by the bylaws of the Egyptian House of Representatives: the Speaker, the Speaker’s Office, the General Committee, the Ethics Committee, the Specialized Committees, the Ad

11/30/2018 . By TIMEP

When Egypt’s current legislature gathered under the dome of the parliament building on January 10, 2016, the country completed the final step in its “democratic road map.” But simply convening

07/20/2017 . By Mohamed El Dahshan

A television commercial showed beautiful young people walking out on their daily jobs, launching a homemade jam company, a food truck, or a designer furniture store. A voiceover promised that

07/05/2017 . By Osama Diab

Throughout June, the Egyptian cabinet and parliament debated a budget for the 2017–18 fiscal year, which began on July 1. The budget has been referred to in Egypt as the

06/26/2017 . By Mai El-Sadany

TIMEP Nonresident Fellow Mai El-Sadany had an article published in the World Policy Journal‘s Summer 2017 issue, entitled “Justice Denied.” The introduction of her article is excerpted here with their kind permission. The

01/05/2017 . By Erin Fracolli

Various studies and international organizations have noted the benefits of increased women’s representation in government, particularly within authoritarian systems.

08/15/2019 . By TIMEP

Following a car bomb explosion outside of the National Cancer Institute in Cairo on August 4 that killed 20 people, members of Egypt’s House of Representatives condemned terrorism in Egypt. One representative blamed the Muslim Brotherhood for the attack, and others asserted that the attack would not deter Egyptians’ resolve to counter extremism.
The International Relations Committee from the Pan-African Parliament convened in Egypt August 5–8 to discuss regional concerns to the institution. Several officials from the Egyptian House spoke at the continental body’s sessions, highlighting Egypt’s diplomatic efforts and counter-terrorism measures within Africa.

07/31/2019 . By TIMEP

House of Representatives Spokesman Salah Hassiballah held a press conference to discuss the fourth legislative session and several representatives condemned Amnesty International following comments it made criticizing the new NGO Law.

07/17/2019 . By TIMEP

The House of Representatives approved the draft NGO Law on July 15, which will replace the 2017 NGO Law if ratified by President Abdel-Fattah El Sisi. Representatives were critical of the draft law being submitted so close to the end of the legislative session, noting that they did not have an appropriate amount of time to debate it.

07/10/2019 . By TIMEP

The cabinet referred a draft NGO law to the House, which would replace the 2017 NGO Law if approved. The 2019 draft law covers funding issues with domestic and foreign civil society groups, eliminates prison sentences in exchange for harsher financial penalties for violating the law, and permits the Ministry of Social Solidarity to suspend an organization’s operations before obtaining judicial consent. 

When, on January 10, 2016, Egypt’s current legislature gathered under the dome of the parliament building, the country completed the final step in its “democratic roadmap.”  This roadmap had been announced in 2013 by Abdel-Fattah El Sisi, then minister of defense, upon the ouster of President Muhammad Morsi. Sisi declared that the transition to democratic rule would require amending the constitution, the selection of a new president (through which Sisi rose to power) and parliamentary elections, held over six weeks in late 2015.

But simply convening as a parliament does not necessarily mean that body is truly engaging in democratic practice; further analysis is necessary to examine the legislative function of the parliament and the ability of representatives to uphold their sworn oath to respect rule of law and the interests of the Egyptian people.

To this end, the Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy (TIMEP) offers its Egypt Parliament Watch project. Building on the success of its original Legislation Tracker and Parliamentary Election Projects, Egypt Parliament Watch monitors trends and developments in Egypt’s legislative body. Issuing reports, analyses, and regular briefings, the project:

  • Assesses the parliament’s function and performance based on four key indicators:  transparency and public engagement, accountability, balance of powers, and legislative capacity;
  • Tracks legislation issued, with analysis of the content of laws and the process by which they are enacted; and
  • Examines actor dynamics, monitoring key statements and activities in Egypt’s political parties and state bodies.

It is TIMEP’s hope that this project and the analysis found herein will be of use to those interested in Egypt’s progress toward more democratic representation, which was and has been a key demand since the 2011 revolution. As with all of TIMEP’s work, it is intended to inform policies that will support the role of truly democratic institutions as part of a holistic policy program that holds human rights and rule of law as both inherently valuable and integral to security, stability, and prosperity.