Ten Years On

The Promise of Open Data in Lebanon

When the Lebanese government hired the New-York-based consulting firm Alvarez & Marsal in July to conduct a forensic audit of the country’s Central Bank and study the scale of Lebanon’s economic and financial crisis, many were skeptical. The forensic audit...

Organizing in Tunisia: Legislative Fact Sheet

Since the Jasmine Revolution, a number of decrees and laws have been passed in Tunisia that implicate and affect key rights at the heart of organizing on the ground and online, including the rights to freedom of expression, association, assembly,...

Tunisia as Hub for a North African Human Rights Movement

By the end of 2018, the influx of human rights defenders from Libya and Egypt in particular—but also Maghreb countries—coming to Tunis became more prominent, something that cannot be said for any other capital in North Africa. While COVID-19 restrictions...

Tunisia’s Police Protection Law Brings a Memory of Years of Silence

In October, Tunisian Parliament withdrew the newest version of a police protection law that it has repeatedly attempted to adopt in the past despite fierce opposition. The new draft law on the “protection of security forces” would impose disproportionate criminal...

From Free Space to a Tool of Oppression: What Happened to the Internet Since the Arab Spring?

In 2011, on a wall near the Ministry of Interior in Tunis, protestors sprayed the graffiti “Thank you, Facebook” in recognition of how social media platforms helped activists organize, cover the protests, and disseminate information globally. While this has often...

Tunisia 10 Years Later: Is Kamour the New Sidi Bouzid?

A decade after the 2010 eruption of Tunisia’s revolution, which led to the overthrow of a 23-year-old one-party regime, Tunisians are still unable to translate their political achievements into social and economic gains. This December 17, on the ten-year anniversary...