Battle of the Camel

February 2, 2011 . By

Mubarak supporters riding on camels and horses attacked protesters in Tahrir Square in what would become known as “the Battle of the Camel,” a pivotal point in the eighteen days. Pro-Mubarak marchers surrounded Tahrir Square both on foot and on camels and horses before engaging in face-to-face combat with anti-government protesters camping out in the square. Protesters threw glass, stones, and Molotov cocktails, and they were met with live ammunition from the Mubarak supporters leading the attack.

The battle, which lasted into the next day, left 11 dead and over 600 injured. Twenty-five members of the Mubarak-led National Democratic Party were jailed for orchestrating the attack. Although meant as a scare tactic to quash protests, the operation appeared to have the opposite effect, instead providing the protesters with the necessary resolve to remain steadfast in their demands.

During the day, companies monitoring Internet traffic globally announced that Internet service was “gradually” being restored in Egypt following the government blackout enacted January 27-28.